A message from the owner of servicedogtags.com

by sussie on April 17, 2014

{ 0 comments }

A new video about one of our hottest selling vests

by sussie on April 15, 2014

{ 0 comments }

Laws differ regarding emotional support animals

by sussie on March 6, 2014

By REBECCA EVERETT

Friday, January 17, 2014

A steady increase in the number of people who rely on emotional support animals adds to the confusion about service dogs and their place in public.

Emotional support animals are not granted the same public access guaranteed to service dogs, but many people don’t know the difference between the two designations, said dog trainer Pam Murphy.

“It’s kind of a gray area,” she said.

The Americans with Disabilities Act defines a service animal as a dog (or miniature horse) individually trained to do work or perform tasks for a person with a disability. Emotional support animals, while they may help their owner stay calm and feel comfortable, are not trained to perform tasks.

“Dogs whose sole function is to provide comfort or emotional support do not qualify as a service animals,” the act states.

That said, there are some federal protections for the owners of emotional support animals. The Fair Housing Act, for instance, states that a person with a disability cannot be denied access to housing because he or she relies on an emotional support animal. The Air Carrier Access Act allows the animal to ride in the cabin of an airplane with its owner.

But both airlines and landlords are allowed to require a signed letter from a licensed mental health professional that states that the person has a mental health disability that requires a support animal.

Meanwhile, an incident at a local shelter in 2012 illustrates just how confusing — and to some degree, contradictory — the regulations can be when it comes to emotional support animals.

When Christy McNerney and her 9-pound spaniel-bichon frise mix, Scruffles, showed up at the Craig’s Place shelter, staff were unsure whether the dog should be allowed. She insisted the dog should be treated like a service dog and the police were called, at her request. A police officer read a letter from McNerney’s psychotherapist that said she needed an emotional support animal and the officer told shelter staff they must let the dog stay.

Kevin Noonan, executive director of Craig’s Doors, the organization that runs the shelter, said he contacted Disability Services at UMass and was again told that the dog must be allowed. “Our worry was that someone here would be afraid of dogs,” he said.

In the end, McNerney and Scruffles stayed at the shelter for a few months and Noonan said Scruffles was a very well-behaved guest. They have not had anyone ask to bring in an emotional support animal since, he said.

The Fair Housing Act states “a housing facility, program or service must permit the assistance animal as an accomodation,” and issued a memorandum in 2013 specifying that shelters and other housing that receives public funds are required to comply.

Another difference between service and emotional support animals is that while the former is limited to dogs or miniature horses, emotional support animals can be any species, from ducks to pot-bellied pigs.

That’s what troubles Ellen Kennedy, a JFK Middle School teacher who has a service dog. People may feel that they need their snake to be with them for emotional support, she said, but you can’t train a snake to behave appropriately in all situations.

“I’m sure the animal does provide support, but I’m not sure that can be justified if they’re not trained properly,” she said. “I do think ultimately we’ll see legislation limiting it to dogs and miniature horses.”

{ 0 comments }

Service Dog Tags Customer Service Line

by sussie on February 28, 2014

Sorry for lack of response to phone calls. Our customer service rep has a case of laryngitis. She should be OK by Monday.

{ 0 comments }

Laws differ regarding emotional support animals

by sussie on February 12, 2014

A steady increase in the number of people who rely on emotional support animals adds to the confusion about service dogs and their place in public.

Emotional support animals are not granted the same public access guaranteed to service dogs, but many people don’t know the difference between the two designations, said dog trainer Pam Murphy.

“It’s kind of a gray area,” she said.

The Americans with Disabilities Act defines a service animal as a dog (or miniature horse) individually trained to do work or perform tasks for a person with a disability. Emotional support animals, while they may help their owner stay calm and feel comfortable, are not trained to perform tasks.

“Dogs whose sole function is to provide comfort or emotional support do not qualify as a service animals,” the act states.

That said, there are some federal protections for the owners of emotional support animals. The Fair Housing Act, for instance, states that a person with a disability cannot be denied access to housing because he or she relies on an emotional support animal. The Air Carrier Access Act allows the animal to ride in the cabin of an airplane with its owner.

But both airlines and landlords are allowed to require a signed letter from a licensed mental health professional that states that the person has a mental health disability that requires a support animal.

Meanwhile, an incident at a local shelter in 2012 illustrates just how confusing — and to some degree, contradictory — the regulations can be when it comes to emotional support animals.

When Christy McNerney and her 9-pound spaniel-bichon frise mix, Scruffles, showed up at the Craig’s Place shelter, staff were unsure whether the dog should be allowed. She insisted the dog should be treated like a service dog and the police were called, at her request. A police officer read a letter from McNerney’s psychotherapist that said she needed an emotional support animal and the officer told shelter staff they must let the dog stay.

Kevin Noonan, executive director of Craig’s Doors, the organization that runs the shelter, said he contacted Disability Services at UMass and was again told that the dog must be allowed. “Our worry was that someone here would be afraid of dogs,” he said.

In the end, McNerney and Scruffles stayed at the shelter for a few months and Noonan said Scruffles was a very well-behaved guest. They have not had anyone ask to bring in an emotional support animal since, he said.

The Fair Housing Act states “a housing facility, program or service must permit the assistance animal as an accomodation,” and issued a memorandum in 2013 specifying that shelters and other housing that receives public funds are required to comply.

Another difference between service and emotional support animals is that while the former is limited to dogs or miniature horses, emotional support animals can be any species, from ducks to pot-bellied pigs.

That’s what troubles Ellen Kennedy, a JFK Middle School teacher who has a service dog. People may feel that they need their snake to be with them for emotional support, she said, but you can’t train a snake to behave appropriately in all situations.

“I’m sure the animal does provide support, but I’m not sure that can be justified if they’re not trained properly,” she said. “I do think ultimately we’ll see legislation limiting it to dogs and miniature horses.”

{ 0 comments }

New collars at Service Dog Tags!

by sussie on February 5, 2014

Save 15% On These
Fine European Leather Collars

Use Coupon Code EYECANDY between now and February 9th

 

CLICK HERE TO ORDER

{ 0 comments }

Service Dog Tags will never give out certificates to “register” or “certify” an animal.

by sussie on January 15, 2014

Do certificates prove tenants’ pets are emotional support animals?

Tenants are using official-looking certificates from a website to argue that by law, a property manager must let them keep their animals. Are they right?

November 10, 2013|By Martin Eichne:
Question: I am a partner in a small property management company. I know that disability and reasonable accommodation issues need to be handled carefully, so I try to keep up with the latest rules. However, I have recently received “certificates” from tenants for their pets from a website, certifying their pet as an emotional support animal. My owners are very worried about being sued and are afraid to say no when they see these very official-looking certificates. Are we bound to allow these pets just because we receive these Internet certificates?

Answer: The short answer to your question is no. A certificate from a website, in all likelihood, has nothing to do with whether a tenant is entitled to have an emotional support animal.

As a housing provider, your decisions regarding whether to accept a tenant’s emotional support animal are guided by the state and federal fair housing laws. Some people confuse these laws with the Americans With Disabilities Act. Service animals are treated differently in some ways under the ADA, which applies to public places, such as restaurants.

However, none of these laws requires a service animal to be “certified.”

Under the ADA, a service animal must be individually trained to do work or perform tasks for people with disabilities.

Under the fair housing laws, an emotional support animal or other type of medical support animal does not have to be individually trained. All that matters is that the tenant has a disability within the meaning of the fair housing laws and that the animal ameliorates the effects of the disability in some way.

The required paperwork for a tenant seeking to qualify a support animal is a letter from a medical professional familiar with the tenant’s condition that attests to the tenant’s disability, and to the role the animal plays in treating the tenant’s disability.

The question remains whether a service animal “certificate” from a website establishes a tenant’s right to have an emotional support animal. The answer to this question is almost certainly no.

Regardless of the seemingly official nature of the website certificate, you do not know what standards were used in issuing the certificate, if any, or what kind of information the applicant submitted to secure the certificate. First and foremost, a certificate from a website is unlikely to be from a medical professional personally familiar with the tenant’s disability. A website cannot honestly state whether or how this specific animal facilitates his or her disabled owner’s ability to use and enjoy housing — which, after all, is the standard the tenant must meet under the fair housing laws.

Eichner is director of Housing Counseling Programs for Project Sentinel, a Bay Area nonprofit. Send questions to info@housing.org.

 

 

But from a company that supports the laws. Buy from ServiceDogTags.com!

{ 0 comments }

Happy Holidays from Service Dog Tags

by sussie on December 23, 2013

Happy Holidays from Service Dog Tags

http://www.jacquielawson.com/viewcard.asp?code=4514351533194&source=jl999&utm_medium=internal_email&utm_source=pickup&utm_campaign=receivercontent

{ 0 comments }

Happy Thanksgiving everyone

by sussie on November 27, 2013

http://www.jacquielawson.com/viewcard.asp?code=4366984643194&source=jl999&utm_medium=internal_email&utm_source=pickup&utm_campaign=receivercontent

{ 0 comments }

Holiday Hours

by sussie on November 22, 2013

We will be closed 11/28 for Thanksgiving and at noon 12/24. We will be closed all day 12/25, 12/31 and 1/1/2014

{ 0 comments }